jump to navigation

“101 Dalmations” musical posts closing notice March 23, 2010

Posted by ronannarbor in musical theater.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
comments closed

“101 Dalmations” the musical, has posted a closing notice. It will continue with its current tour, which opens in NYC at Madison Square Garden in a few weeks, and will close on 4/18. All further national tour dates have been cancelled.

This is a shame — I’ve previously written a blog entry on the show. It needed work, and it was not ready for prime time. 101 Dalmations has played at both the Fox Theater in Detroit and Wharton Center in East Lansing during the past few month.

Rachel York, the show’s dynamite shining star, departed the cast on January 31st. Sara Gettelfinger took over the role of  Cruella DeVil and will play the part in NYC. Sad to see another show with 30 cast members and a huge crew close — but the show never achieved its lofty goals, had a week score, and required massive re-do of sets, costumes, and concept (i.e. eliminating adults on stilts) if it wanted to go anywhere. It might have been beyond fixing. At either rate, the producers did not give reason for closing the show.

Advertisements

“The Wizard of Oz” musical tour – non-Equity February 1, 2010

Posted by ronannarbor in Entertainment, musical theater.
Tags: , ,
comments closed

As a point of reference, the current NETworks (MSG tours) musical of “The Wizard of Oz” is non-equity. As a member of SDC, the directors and choreographers professional theatre union, I can not in good conscious review this production as a professional musical theatre tour in Detroit.

I can not comment on the quality of this production. I don’t intend to see it. It has gotten generally good reviews across the country (the show has been touring since 2008).

101 Dalmations, the Musical — Review November 23, 2009

Posted by ronannarbor in Ann Arbor, Detroit, Entertainment, Pets, Theatre.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
comments closed

There are three reasons to see 101 DALMATIONS, THE MUSICAL….1) Rachel York, 2) Rachel York, and 3) Rachel York. Playing Cruella DeVil she has enough energy for three shows — look out Glenn Close, your nemesis has arrived.

Rachel York in 101 Dalmations, The Musical.

Cast, kids, and Dogs in 101 Dalmations, the Musical

Ok, now that I got that out of the way, I can honestly say that I enjoyed the musical more than I should have. Any new musical is always better than no new musicals. But 101 Dalmations is not ready for prime time. It’s a shame — they have a lot going for them, including a great musical score, good performances all around, some very enthusiastic kids in the cast, and that knock-out performance by Rachel York.

But it has a lot of problems too. Seen in the Sunday afternoon performance at the Fox Theatre in Detroit, in a half-empty house, the audience young and old was squirming in their seats by mid-Act One. The 5-year olds were mostly OUT of their seats by that point.

And there’s the problem — when the show works well it appeals to both kids and adults. When it is at its worst, even the adults have a hard time sitting still. There is too much talk — WAY too much talk — like a half hour too much talk in this 2-hour musical. And there is actually too much music too!…It’s a terrific score that mixes in all styles of musical comedy-style songs, but there is too much of it.  Trim the show to 90 minutes without an intermission, and you’ll have yourself a tight family entertainment.

Then there are the stilt problems. To make the “dogs” (played by people) look smaller, the rest of the cast is on 15 inch stilts. It looks terrible. While the sets are creatively skewed to make everything look like you are looking at it from a dogs-eye view, the stilts themselves are ridiculous. Two performers fell during this performance — and I have to admit by the middle of the first act, I started to watch the stilt walkers (and dancers) to see who else might go down, sort of the same way you watch figure skaters, to see who falls on their butt. That was enough to distract me from what might otherwise be some fine moments. I’d suggest they cut the stilts and work on creative use of costumes to achieve the same effect.

And then there is the other major problem — there aren’t enough dogs. Sure the kids are cute when they dance — and the Bark Chain is particularly well handled. The directing is generally sound. But the real dogs are reserved for dog tricks at the end of the acts, and there isn’t enough — the tricks are fun! A dog pees and flowers grow. They have charisma — the entire audience comes to life while they are on stage. It’s too bad that the rest of the show doesn’t have that kind of spark of life.

Which brings me back to Rachel York. She chews up the scenery, sings her heart out, flays her arms and legs and manages to stay balanced, and just seems to be having the time of her life. Her demise is strange — I understand why they handle it the way they do — it IS a family musical with lots of children in the audience after all…but it’s an anti-climatic end to an otherwise great stage performance.

To save yourself two hours — you can see Rachel York perform her entire number called “Hot” here: http://www.the101dalmatiansmusical.com/index.html

I liked the show. I hope they take the time to fix it as it travels across the country prior to a three-week engagement at the Theatre at Madison Square Garden. It’s not ready for a full-time Broadway production. It’s a shame. There are a lot of good actors and technicians at work here. But in the long-run, it needs work, lots of it, and more real dogs. Even if they do nothing else but cross the stage from time to time with the actors.

Despite that, the audience really seemed to have a great time. The chatter at intermission wasn’t bad – people genuinely liked the show. And there sure is a dearth of decent family-oriented musicals these days. The audience reviews at Ticketmaster.com, for example, are almost all entirely A’s and B’s. That’s pretty darn good!…And you actually do leave the theatre humming the theme song. That’s not bad either.

In a surreal moment – the show ended at the same time the Lions game ended down the street. Lions fans and families with toddlers mixed on Woodward in what can only be described as Detroit at its finest.

Patti Lupone at Hill Auditorium — Review November 21, 2009

Posted by ronannarbor in Ann Arbor, Entertainment, Theatre.
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
comments closed

The first of the fall’s big local Broadway Events occured last night at Hill Auditorium, presented by the University Musical Society at the University of Michigan — Patti Lupone in concert (“Coulda Woulda Shoulda”).

Comprised of songs she has sung in Broadway productions, songs she could have sung, and songs she made her own with a special twist, the two-hour evening was thrilling, entertaining, and reminded the audience just what a Broadway Diva Patti truly is.

Starting the evening off by shouting “Go Blue” followed by an anti-OSU slur, she had the crowd in the palm of her hand from the first moments — what followed was pure Broadway at it’s best. “Don’t Cry for Me Argentina” continues to amaze, and a set in which she sang songs normally performed by men on stage was fun and edgy.

The years have mellowed Patti. Her stories between song sets are tamer, and less obscenity-strewn. I’ve seen her perform many many times live now — on stage in Evita, Sunset Boulevard, Gypsy, Anything Goes…on stage with her cabaret show at NYC’s Bottom Line on two occasions, and in several other performances in NYC. She no longer shares stories of intoxicated travels while performing on cruise ships. This is a more refined Patti — a Patti that has literally seen it all, and then some.

She’s been performing the Coulda Woulda Shoulda concert now since 2007, alternating performances with her Patti Live concert, and a shared evening with Mandy Patinkin. No matter which incarnation of her concert you see, she’s a force to be reckoned with, and remains one of America’s musical theatre treasures.

Ann Arbor was treated to a taste of what makes her special — and what makes Broadway special. I rode out a migraine through the show, because she is a diva not to be missed. Brava Patti, Brava. Oh, and I agree….the Buckeyes DO suck…

And that’s the view from Ann Arbor today.

Legally Blonde, The Musical — Tour, Detroit October 20, 2009

Posted by ronannarbor in Detroit, Entertainment, Theatre.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
comments closed

Legally Blonde, the musical, as any 13-year old girl knows, is the girl-power Broadway show that tells the tale of Elle Woods trip to Harvard Law School, initially to follow her ex-boyfriend, and ultimately to find success as a lawyer, find new love, and save the day for a former sorority sister accused of murder. I mention the 13-year old girls, because the Broadway Production was televised on MTV continuously for about three months last year, creating it’s own super-buzz and following. The tour now stops at the Fisher Theatre — and it’s good.

It’s easy to dismiss this entertaining musical — but sit in the theatre for a live presentation for a few hours and you will find yourself completely delighted by the show and its infectious energy and music.

ElleBecky Gulsvig as Elle Woods in Legally Blonde, the Musical. Photo courtesy Broadway in Detroit.

Seen in a matinee performance filled with screaming 13-year old girls (continuing the nauseating trend started with Wicked and it’s screaming-fan audience after every song) Becky Gulsvig appears to be having the time of her life, and the energetic and talented cast exudes charisma. The screaming was there at the Palace Theatre too, by the way, when I saw the show in NYC. It’s a loud show — and not in an appropriate way: the kids talk during the show, eat candy, tear open bags of treats, and act like they are at a movie theatre. You will most likely fare better at an evening performance when the 13-year olds (and their 9 year old sisters) are at home in bed.

For those who have seen the Broadway production, there are a few minor set changes but the production is generally intact…but Jerry Mitchell’s highly energetic directing/choreography work well at the Fisher, and the show is really quite fun.

There isn’t much to think about on the way out the door, but it’s an entertaining piece of musical theatre that fares much better than a lot of movies-turned-into-musicals — and look out when this show is released for amateur production — every high school, college, and community theatre will be jumping on this one: a pop-rock score with enough roles for girls, and its guaranteed amateur theatre overkill. See it now with a professional cast and production values and it’s a show you can genuinely call charming. See it next year at your daughter’s high school and not so much.

Recommended, and better than you would think.

“Evita” – University of Michigan Musical Theatre Program October 17, 2009

Posted by ronannarbor in Entertainment, Theatre.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
comments closed

“Evita”, currently running at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre at the University of Michigan is a musical theatre diamond. Presented by the Musical Theatre department, it is as slick as a Broadway tour, and as tight as a college production can be.

evita_poster

The production reaffirms that the only current professional caliber musical theatre being presented in Ann Arbor is being done by the UM Musical Theatre program. Let me state up front that I love big-budget proscenium-theatre musicals with full orchestras. Especially when they are done right.

Under the expert direction of Linda Goodrich, the show plays out exactly as it should — a fast, straight-forward Act I, followed by an ever-increasingly more emotional Act II, through to the tear-jerker ending. “Buenos Aires” and “A New Argentina” remain Act One’s highlights, while “Don’t Cry for Me Argentina” and “Rainbow Tour” are clearly Act Two’s forte pieces.

To be sure, this is a problematic work of musical theatre. The Peron story doesn’t really play out true to reality, and follows a “spin” on her biography that bends the truth, and is mean-spirited at that. The Broadway production catapulted Patty LuPone to stardom (ironically, she will be performing here later this year).

But this production is simply first rate, from the fine performances of Desi Oakley (Eva) and Carlos Valdes (Che) to the smaller ensemble parts. The costumes, sets, lighting, choreography, sound, and orchestra are professional and slick. In short, everything a production of the show should be. Linda Goodrich and her design team have made the theatre feel twice the size that it is, and the simple (but beautifully designed) tiered set makes the proscenium arch feel far higher than it is. This is just plain old great design work. The costumes here, like in the original Broadway production, instantly make an indelible impression – separating class, age, and social rank – and make scene changes seamless and fluid without set changes. Can I add that Desi gets to wear the most stunning clothing I’ve seen in a show this season? By the time Eva reaches her Rainbow Tour, you are utterly transported to a different time and place. By that point in the story, the emotion has also kicked into high gear and it’s a race to the conclusion. Brava to both Ms. Oakley as well as Linda Goodrich’s fine pacing and direction.

This is a love it or hate it work of theatre. The same can’t be said of the production, and I loved it. Unfortunately, unless you already have tickets, you won’t be seeing this one. Every performance has been sold out for weeks.

On a final note, can we consider this show now “done” here locally? Civic, Encore, UM, EMU, Croswell…

Bloodless, emotionless Sweeney Todd at Encore October 2, 2009

Posted by ronannarbor in Theatre.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
comments closed

When you drain the blood out of Sweeney Todd (the current musical at Encore Musical Theatre Company) you drain the emotion out of the piece as well. When the emotion is gone, there isn’t much to this Sondheim masterpiece.

9524_1232198718816_1044573288_727973_5653003_nWalter O’Neil (Sweeney Todd) and Sarah Litzsinger (Mrs. Lovett) “By the Sea”

9524_1232831294630_1044573288_729856_6393171_nSteve DeBruyne (Anthony) and Thalia Schramm (Johanna) — “Kiss Me”

There are some fine things going on this production, but suspense is not one of them. Perhaps the three people in the audience who have never seen this musical, nor the movie adaptation, might find some surprise in the clever book and lyrics, but those of us who know this show backwards and forwards certainly will not.

Entering the theatre, you are at once surrounded by Dan Walkers’s marvelous set. Appropriately subdued and surprisingly colorful when needed, this is a wonderful approach to the set in this blackbox setting. And Kudos to Encore for making everything look great! I loved that the air conditioning vent has now been painted black, and that it looks more like a “theatre” with every visit!

The Sweeney Orchestra is the finest I have heard at the Encore! Congratulations! The 9-piece ensemble plays in-tune, and sounds wonderful — oh that Sondheim music. I did miss the factory whistle in the score, and the production was plagued with the now-typical problem of actors being unable to hear the orchestra, and entrances not being together as they can’t see the conductor. I have to compliment both musical director Tyler Driskill and his entire cast for the best diction I have ever heard in a production of Sweeney (and trust me, I’ve seen dozens of them – professional, amateur, and even high school).

Sarah Litzsinger makes a fine Mrs. Lovett; Walter O’Neil a fine Sweeney. Their scenes together are fun. Mind you, not creepy, but fun. Sue Booth performs wonderful work as The Beggar Woman — how wonderful to see her singing on stage again! Steve DeBruyne proves that there is nothing he can do wrong playing almost any role you might throw at him, including nicely acted Anthony here, and Thalia Schramm is a pretty (if very healthy and not-at-all pale) Johanna.  Paul Hopper turns in an appropriately dry Judge, but Jeff Steinhauer struggles with the difficult score and is generally too nice as the Beadle.

Uneven performances are turned in by others. Scott Longpre at times is just fine at Tobias, at others, not so much. The same can be said of John Sartor’s Pirelli which is over the top, but uneven throughout. I did enjoy his scene in Sweeney’s parlor, though. And Longpre turns in a lovely “Not While I’m Around”.

The ensemble is similar to Okalahoma’s — generally too young, not all of the cast members up to the difficult Sondheim score, and generally of community theatre quality. So far, I have been unimpressed by Encore’s aim to integrate the “best” community based actors with the professionals on stage. In just about every performance I have seen there, the professionals and community ensemble do not mesh well together, and there are large gaps in quality between them.

So that brings me to other issues with the show: this production is one in which the average age of the Londoners seems to be about 15. There are not enough adult men. Most of the visitors to Sweeney’s barber chair are too young to have sprouted whiskers themselves. The show is female-heavy, forcing the few men in the ensemble to play multiple roles – even when they follow one scene to the next: in the most glaring instance, a cast-member just killed on the barber chair is suddenly alive and talking in the very next scene on stage. The entire non-professional cast suffers from pitch problems.

Then there are the costumes. I don’t know what the production team was thinking in mixing modern-day clothing with period pieces, but it doesn’t work. I’ve directed dozens of musicals myself, and partaken in many shows where this “out of time” costuming works — Sweeney Todd is not one of them. Tobias wears t-shirts that announce “Pirelli’s Miracle Elixor” and later “Mrs. Lovett’s Meat Pies”.  The Ensemble is dressed in costumes that look like leftovers from the chorus of Carrie, the Musical. Sweeney looks like a Pirate. Later he wears sunglasses.

Particularly jarring are Johanna’s costumes — lines don’t even make sense the way she is dressed. Playing her own mother earlier in the show, she wears a daydress. Huh? Later, as Johanna, she wears a prep school uniform. If she’s wearing a prep school uniform, it’s implied she is going to school. If she is going to prep school, she is leaving the house — something that Johanna would never be permitted to do by the Judge.

This leads to a greater problem: There is no sense that Johanna is “trapped” in her life with the Judge — in fact, she sings “Green Finch and Linnet Bird” in front of a staircase that would easily take her away from the abusive Judge. Later, instead of Anthony climbing upstairs to see her on her balcony, she uses those same stairs to walk down to the street to meet him. At another point in the production, the Judge’s house moves mysteriously from stage left to stage right. Huh?

My favorite moment? The physical comedy of Sarah Litzsinger’s “By the Sea’ and the wonderfully funny little surprise on her “Oh that was lovely” line just after. Precious comedy that.

But finally — it all boils down to the strange artistic direction choices made in the show. The directing here is uneven — better in intimate moments, but utterly baffling in others. Cast members singing counterpoint in the trio holding choir folders? Exits and entrances from directions that don’t make sense?

And that brings me to the blood. Or lack of blood. Or any creepiness factor at all. This is the G-rated version of Sweeney. Seriously, I’ve seen high school productions of this show that were creepier and scarier. I’m not sure what the problem here is. Is Encore afraid of alienating their Dexter-based audience? Do they not trust that we can handle this show as an audience? If not, why do a show that involves murder, and killing people with a razor knife? Murders are bloodless and clean. Actors stand up and walk away from the chair rather than falling through the trap in the floor. Sweeney’s knife never once glistens with blood.

And Mrs.Lovett never once contemplates strangling Tobias with the knitted muffler she places around his neck.

Without the suspense, the drama is sapped out of the show. That leaves you with an unemotional ending, one in which the audience doesn’t care who has lived and who has died, because we have not been asked to share in the journey — we haven’t cringed at Sweeney’s dark humor as the show progresses, and we haven’t felt Mrs. Lovett’s guilt. Somewhere under that makeup, we need to see that she is trapped in her own big lie, and ultimately feel her humanness and frailty in the final moments. Otherwise, there’s just an oven.

Whether the blood is real (like in the original Broadway production – which went through buckets of red dyed corn syrup every night) or implied in it’s creepy simplicity (one bucket being poured into the other in the recent Broadway revival) there needs to be something. Anything. Make me feel some level of discomfort. Let me wonder how they did it. Let me see the glimmer of red blood as Sweeney flicks his knife through the air. Let me hear the blood pouring from bucket to bucket as the audience goes “yuck” in unison. Anything.

Sweeney Todd continues at the Encore Theatre through October 18th. Tickets an be purchased at http://www.theencoretheatre.org or by calling 734-268-6200. The box office is at 3126 Broad Street in Dexter. Call for box office hours.

——————-

On a related note — I want nothing but success for the Encore. Sorry if some of the reviews sound harsh, but when you set out to achieve a lofty goal of professional musical theatre, you shouldn’t need to be judged by community theatre standards.

That being said — the theatre is in need of several things. First — adult men! Please audition for future shows at the Encore! I know you’re out there — I’ve cast you in my musicals. Drag your butt to Dexter and audition.

Second, the theatre can use some donations: black paint (lots of things on walls still need to be painted). Black heavy-duty power extension cords for lighting (black only please, not orange, not green, not blue). A tv monitor system: this includes a tv for the house so that the cast can see the conductor, and cameras at the back of the house so the conductor can see the cast, and cameras in the pit, so that the actors can see the conductor. I’m sure they could use some other things as well — give the theatre a call and see how you can pitch in! Let’s make this work; it’s a gem in the making, and let’s see what we can do to make it even better!

On a final note to the Encore: I will not be reviewing ANNIE, your next production. I’ve seen enough (and directed enough) community theatre productions of this show to last me a lifetime. I am sure it will bring you a bucket load of money from your audiences, and will keep the family-friendly audiences in Dexter happy. But count me out. The professional tours of the show come through Detroit every couple years. That’s the only versions of Annie I am willing to watch anymore. Good luck with your production, see you at 25th Annual Putnum County Spelling Bee!

And that’s the view from Ann Arbor today…

Musicals that are appropriate for small venues (Musical Theater 101) August 25, 2009

Posted by ronannarbor in Entertainment, Theatre.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
comments closed

Seeing the announcement of yet another inappropriate musical in a small venue local theatre, I thought I would help them out by listing, from a directing and design point of view, musicals that are appropriate for small venue theaters and those that are not. I list appropriate shows in alphabetical order, followed by inappropriate shows in alphabetical order.  In most instances, trying to force a large-venue proscenium show into a small theatre space not only looks claustrophobic, breaks with the integrity of the piece, and in general doesn’t work in that small venue. From time to time a theatre might “pull it off” (a theatre in Connecticut recently did an almost set-less production of The Producers in the round! that worked)…but for the most part, they don’t work.  Here’s some help for this small venue local theatre that keeps picking inappropriate shows… The following is nowhere near a complete list, but its a good start. Note that most small-venue shows will almost always work in larger venues. Larger venue shows will almost never work in smaller venues.

Musicals Appropriate for Small Venues

Adding Machine

Aint Misbehavin’

The All Night Strut

Allegro

All Shook Up

Altar Boyz

Always, Patsy Cline

Amour

Aspects of Love

Assassins

Avenue Q

Baby

Bat Boy

Bed and Sofa

Beehive

Brooklyn

Blood Brothers

Bright Lights Big City

Buddy

Cabaret

Candide

Caroline or Change

A Catered Affair

Charlotte Sweet

Chess

Closer than Ever

Company

Dames at Sea

A Day in Hollywood/A Night in the Ukraine

Debbie Does Dallas, the Musical

Dessa Rose

Diamonds

The Drowsy Chaperone

Ernest in Love

Evil Dead, the Musical

Falsettos

Falsettoland

The Fantasticks

Floyd Collins

Forever Plaid

Frogs

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum

Goblin Market

Godspell

The Goodbye Girl

Grand Hotel

Grease

The Great Trailer Park Musical

Grey Gardens

Grind

Hedwig and the Angry Inch

Hello Again

High Fidelity

Honk

I can Get it For You Wholesale

Irma la Duce

I Love My Wife

I Love You You’re Perfect Now Change

I Remember Mama

Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living in Paris

Jane Eyre

Jerry’s Girls

Jerry Springer the Opera

The Last 5 Years

Little Shop of Horrors

Little Women

LoveMusik

Lucky Stiff

A Man of No Importance

March of the Falsettos

Marie Christine

Moby Dick the Musical

My Favorite Year

Naked Boys Singing

A New Brain

Next to Normal

Nunsense

Oh, Coward

On a Clear Day You can See Forever

Once on this Island

110 In The Shade

Pacific Overtures

Passion

Pump Boys and Dinettes

Putting it Together

Rent

Ring of Fire

The Rink

The Roar of the Greasepaint, the Smell of the Crowd

The Robber Bridegroom

Rocky Horror Show

Romance, Romance

Scrooge

The Secret Garden

Seesaw

She Loves Me

Shout, The Mod Musical

Side by Side by Sondheim

Snoopy

Songs for a New World

Spring Awakening

The Story of my Life

Stop The World, I Want to Get Off

Summer of ‘42

Sunday in the Park with George

Sweeney Todd

The Sweet Smell of Success

Taboo

Tell Me on a Sunday

They’re Playing Our Song

The Thing About Men

3 Guys Naked from the Waist Down

13

Tick Tick Boom

Title of Show

Triumph of Love

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

Urinetown

Violet

Weird Romance

The Woman in White

Working

A Year with Frog and Toad

You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown

Xanadu

Musicals Inappropriate for Small Venues

The Act

Aida

All Shook Up

Annie

Annie Get Your Gun

Anything Goes

Applause

Babes in Arms

The Baker’s Wife

Barnum

Beauty and the Beast

Bells are Ringing

The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas

Big

Big River

Bonnie & Clyde

The Boyfriend

The Boys from Syracuse

Brigadoon

By Jeeves!

Bye Bye Birdie

Camelot

Carousel

Carrie

Cats

Chicago

Children of Eden

A Chorus Line

A Christmas Carol

Cinderella

City of Angels

The Civil War

Copacabana

Crazy for You

Curtains

Damn Yankees

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels

Dreamgirls

Evita

Fame

Fiddler on the Roof

Finian’s Rainbow

Fiorello

Flower Drum Song

Follies

Footloose

42nd Street

Fosse

Frankenstein the Musical

The Full Monty

Funny Girl

George M!

Ghost

Greenwillow

Guys and Dolls

Gypsy

Hair

Hairspray

Half a Sixpence

Hello Dolly

High School Musical

High School Musical 2

High Society

How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying

I can Get it For You Wholesale

In the Heights

Into the Woods

Jekyll and Hyde

Jesus Christ Superstar

Joseph and the Technicolor Dreamcoat

The King and I

Kismet

Kiss Me Kate

Kiss of the Spider Woman

La Cage aux Folles

The Last Starfighter

Leader of the Pack

Legally Blond

Les Miserables

The Light in The Piazza

The Lion King

A Little Night Music

Mack and Mabel

Mame

Mamma Mia

Merrily We Roll Along

Man of LaMancha

Me and My Girl

Meet Me In St Louis

Memphis

Metropolis

Miss Saigon

The Most Happy Fella

Movin’ Out

The Music Man

My Fair Lady

The Mystery of Edwin Drood

My One and Only

Nine

9 to 5 the musical

Notre Dame de Paris

No No Nanette

Notre Dame de Paris

Oklahoma

Oliver

On the Town

On the Twentieth Century

On Your Toes

Once Upon a Mattress

Over Here!

Paint Your Wagon

The Pajama Game

Pal Joey

Parade

Peter Pan

Phantom

Phantom of the Opera

Pippin

The Pirates of Penzance

The Pirate Queen

The Producers

Promises, Promises

Purlie

Rags

Ragtime

7 Brides for 7 Brothers

70 Girls 70

Shreck

Song of Norway

Sophisticated Ladies

Sunset Boulevard

Saturday Night Fever

Seussical the Musical

Shenandoah

Showboat

Side Show

Singin’ in the Rain

Showboat

Smile

Song and Dance

The Sound of Music

South Pacific

Spamalot

Starlight Express

State Fair

Steel Pier

Sunday in the Park with George

Sweet Charity

Swing!

Take Me Along

A Tale of Two Cities

The Tap Dance Kid

Tarzan the Musical

Thoroughly Modern Millie

Timbuktu

Titanic

Tommy

Two Gentlemen of Verona

We Will Rock You

The Wedding Singer

West Side Story

Whistle Down the Wind

White Christmas

Wicked

The Will Rogers Follies

The Witches of Eastwick

The Wiz

The Wizard of Oz

Woman of the Year

Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown

Professional Musical Theatre – Detroit Regional 2009-2010 June 28, 2009

Posted by ronannarbor in Ann Arbor, Detroit, Entertainment, Theatre.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
comments closed

Broadway is alive and well across the region during the coming musical theatre season. Note that the following list is not comprehensive, and it does not include any community theatre listings nor small venues, only professional theatre in full-sized houses. I have included UM and MSU seasons at the end. This includes Detroit musical theatre venues, as well as those within a short drive of Detroit.  Particularly noteworthy this season is the pre-Broadway tryout of The Addams Family in Chicago this fall — starring Nathan Lane and Bebe Neuwirth. Also noteworthy is this fall’s The Boys in the Photograph in Toronto, a reworking of the Andrew Lloyd Weber’s The Beautiful Game.

Support Broadway. Go see a Broadway show.

BROADWAY IN DETROIT 2009-2010

Ethel Merman’s Broadway (Gem Theatre) Sept 9 – Dec 31

Phantom of the Opera (Detroit Opera House) Sept 8 – Sept 27th

Legally Blond (Fisher) Oct 15 – Nov 01

Jersey Boys (Fisher) Dec 17 – Jan 23

The Wizard of Oz (Fisher) Jan 29-Feb 14

Young Frankenstein (Detroit Opera House) Feb 23 – March 14

Spring Awakening (Fisher) April 20 – May 09

OLYMPIA ENTERTAINMENT DETROIT (Fox) 2009-2010

101 Dalmations, The Musical  Nov 17-22

Little House on the Prairie, The Musical  Dec 1 – 5

Jesus Christ Superstar with Ted Neeley, Feb 14

STRANAHAN THEATRE TOLEDO  2009-2010

The Wedding Singer Oct 1 – 4

The Drowsy Chaperone Jan 14 – 17

The Rat Pack is Back Feb 25 – 28

Wicked March 31 – April 18

BROADWAY IN CHICAGO 2009-2010

Jersey Boys (Bank of America Theatre) Open ended run

Spring Awakening (Oriental Theatre) Aug 04 – 16

Cats (Cadillac Palace) Oct 13 – 18

Young Frankenstein (Cadillac Palace) Nov 3 – Dec 13

The Addams Family Pre-Broadway tryout (Oriental Theatre) Nov 13 – Jan 10

In the Heights (Cadillac Palace) Dec 15 – Jan 03

Dreamgirls (Cadillac Palace) Jan 19 – 31

Mamma Mia! Jan 19-24

Annie  Jan 19-24

The 101 Dalmations Pre-Broadway tryout (Oriental Theatre) Feb 16 – 28

Billy Elliot (March 18 – this is a sit-down)

Beauty and the Beast (Mar 23 – Apr 4)

Shrek The Musical (Oriental Theatre) July 13 – Sept 5 (unconfirmed: this will be a sit-down)

MACOMB CENTER

Tap Dogs – Oct 24

Menopause the Musical – Jan 15-16

Camelot – Jan 30

A Year With Frog and Toad – Mar 7

Forbidden Broadway 25th Ann tour – Apr 17

PLAYHOUSE SQUARE BROADWAY IN CLEVELAND 2009-2010

Young Frankenstein (Palace) Oct 13-25

Chicago (Palace) Jan 12-24

In the Heights (Palace) Feb 9 – 21

Xanadu (Palace) March 2 – 14

Grease (Palace) May 11 – 23

Fiddler on the Roof (Palace) June 15-27

TORONTO MIRVISH and DANCAP 2009-2010

Jersey Boys (Toronto Centre for the Arts) Open ended run continues

The Sound of Music (Princess of Wales) Open ended run continues

The Boys in the Photograph (aka: The Beautiful Game) (Royal Alexandra) Sep 22 – Nov 1

Rock of Ages (April 20 – June 6)

Priscilla Queen of the Desert (Spring 2010 venue TBA)

Fiddler on the Roof (Dec 2009/Jan 2010 Venue TBA)

Young Frankenstein (Mar/Apr 2010 Venue TBA)

Little House on the Prairie The Musical (Jan/Feb 2010 venue TBA)

THE WHARTON CENTER AT MSU BROADWAY SEASON East Lansing (2009-2010)

Irving Berlin’s White Christmas (Dec 8-13)

Young Frankenstein (Feb 2 – 7)

A Chorus Line (April 6 – 11)

South Pacific (Lincoln Center version) April 27- May 2

The 101 Dalmations Pre Broadway Tryout )Jan 26-31)

Phantom of the Opera (May 19 – June 6)

MILLER AUDITORIUM (Kalamazoo) 2009-10 Season

The Wedding Singer (Oct 20-21)

Stomp (Jan 19-20)

Menopause The Musical (Jan 29-31)

Disney’s Beauty and the Beast (Feb 23 – 25)

Avenue Q (April 21-22)

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN MUSICAL THEATRE PROGRAM

Evita (Lydia Mendelssohn) Oct 15 – 18

Ragtime (Power Center) April 15 – 18

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY THEATRE PROGRAM (Pasant Theatre)

The Rocky Horror Show (Sept 25 – Oct 4)

Rent (April 16 – 25)

Superb cast salvages “The Producers” at Croswell Opera House June 22, 2009

Posted by ronannarbor in Entertainment, Theatre.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
comments closed

First — there are huge fans of Mel Brooks’ musical THE PRODUCERS, and there are those who are not (me) 12 Tonys notwithstanding (I voted for “The Full Monty”). It’s an actor’s dream to perform these roles — its another task entirely to sit for three hours in an audience being inundated with mean-spiritedness.

The Producers is an example of a show that worked so well on Broadway with its primarily NYC-based audiences; and a show that faltered in its national tour, and eventually closed when NYC audiences dissipated and it needed to rely on tourists, who didn’t find it as funny nor as entertaining as the apparently more-informed NYC audiences did. It also relied on the star power of Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick — two performances permanently burned into the retinas of audience goers for these roles.

That being said — the cast at Croswell Opera House is as superb as you can expect in an amateur production of the show. Steve Antalek is a fine Max Bialystock, and Patrick Toth a fine Leo Bloom (even if he is 15 years too young for the role). Lucy Hagedorn shines as Ulla, and Jim Craig is a funny Roger DeBris. Special kudos to Jesse Montie who has a pitch-perfect interpretation of Carmen Ghia, and Stephen Smith’s athletic Franz (another actor who is at least 20 years too young for the part).

There is also more good: the orchestra sounds wonderful under the direction of Jonathan Sills, and the costumes by Susan Eversden are literally stunning.

But then there is the bad: the sound is spotty with several mic problems during the course of the performance – but more importantly, some totally missing mic-work — solo lines are inaudible in the house; important lines in songs disappear; and when the ensemble sings one primarily hears only the leads who are on body mics. The opening number is a cacophony of mumbo-jumbo that even those of us who know every word of this show had a hard time making out. “We wanted to stand up and hiss….we’ve seen shit, but never like this” was completely unintelligible, and it’s one of the funniest lines in the show.

The choreography is lacking. “I want to be a producer” is sloppy and poorly choreographed. The taps can not be heard through most of the number, and this is the one place in the show where clean, efficient tapping is required. It’s not the girls fault — they do what they can with a mess of tap steps that do nothing to emphasize the rhythm of the song nor to build to any type of climax. Time steps and shuffles alone do not make for a Broadway tap number. “Springtime for Hitler” is inherently funny — the choreography in this production does nothing to build the number to what it could be; and at times seems to work against it by forcing motions into space that doesn’t fit. The swastika-dance looks great on a big stage when a mirror can be flown in to show the “Busby Berkley” effect of the swastika rotating on stage…here, it just looks like messy marching.

Then there is the ugly: the set design. This is just plain old gawd-awful. It ranges from serviceable (Roger’s apartment) to Junior-High quality (the scenes outside the theatre; and the “Springtime for Hitler” sign that flies in at the end of Act I — which is so awful that Junior High quality might be giving it too much credit.) The paint is not thick enough on the canvas drops, and light shines through from behind (a problem that plagued last year’s A CHRISTMAS CAROL at the Croswell also). The lettering throughout is sloppy and unprofessional. The lettering for the Whitehall and Marks backdrop looks like a high school cheerleading sign hanging in a hallway. The set design is cringe-inducing in it’s awfulness. Even the better pieces have problems — Roger’s apartment doesn’t fit together well on stage (or they missed their marks during the Sunday afternoon performance that I saw) and the lovely Little Old Ladyland heart is fronted by a poorly painted sloppy looking bench.

Therein lies the crux of the matter — The Producers, despite spoofing the “worst show ever” can’t LOOK like the worst show ever. It’s a budget-squashing show that is far more expensive than it looks in the finished product, and it is exactly because of that budget that the show works in professional venues.

What Croswell has is a fine ensemble cast that is stunningly costumed standing in a shell of a set — and it doesn’t work that way. Sloppy graphics and lettering, poorly painted drops, and slow-moving scene changes undo the effort that the cast has put into this show.

I laughed. I know the show inside and out. Everything that worked in this show worked because of the fine and funny script, the great singing voices, and the fine direction of Mark DePietro whose sense of timing, comedy, and efficient stage-work is clearly seen throughout the show. I wish I could say more positive things about the show, but I can’t.  Perhaps my expectations of the Croswell have become too high over the years — but they SHOULD be that high — this is the best Summer Stock in the region.

For the record, Croswell is the only non-professional theatre where I would personally audition for a show. My heart is in directing and choreography, not in performance. But I respect certain directors and some specific shows. I was in last year’s Croswell production of Titanic, the Musical, because it is one of my favorite shows. I was indeed cast in this production of The Producers, but chose not to participate for personal reasons. I look forward to auditioning at Croswell again if the right combination of show and director comes along down the road and my schedule permits. I am also a supporting member of the Croswell Opera House.

There are a slew of other productions of THE PRODUCERS slated for local venues, including one in Ann Arbor this fall. Word of warning to all of them — this is going to be the most expensive musical you have ever produced, and if you don’t have the money to spend, tread carefully.