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“The Family Digs” at Croswell Opera House — a great way to inaugurate new studio (review) October 15, 2017

Posted by ronannarbor in Croswell Opera House, Plays.
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Terrence Hissong’s very funny new family comedy “The Family Digs” opened this weekend to inaugurate the new Croswell Opera House studio theatre (which also doubles as a rehearsal space and you would be hard-pressed to recognize the place). The production is co-produced by Croswell Opera House and Westfall-Hissong production company.

Doug Miller’s spot-on direction and set design result in a fast-paced premier production in the studio, and he has a terrific cast to direct here.

Without giving too much away (its best to see this show not knowing much about it): grown brother and sister Eve and Sunshine (don’t ask, just go with it and find out for yourself) are at wits end when he’s overstayed his welcome in her small apartment. Archeologist father Charles arrives to seek solace when his wife has locked him out of their home. Throw in two of Eve’s work friends Hannah and Sophia with a special proposition and you have the makings of terrific little family comedy that might remind you a bit of your own, especially when you find yourself in cramped quarters.

Meg McNamee is funny neurotic as sister Eve, and J0nathan Stelzer (welcome back to the stage!) is hilarious as Sunshine. Peter Stewart makes for a funny father, beset by a strange malady involving bees. Karen Miller and Emily Allshouse are great in their roles of Eve’s work buddies. Things really start clicking when the interplay between them starts to roll along and Hissong’s use of present day vernacular makes everything feel genuine and real. There are a few twists and turns, and at least a couple surprises in store.

Doug Miller’s set is gorgeous, and looks like a permanent installation rather than the temporary studio set that it is. Lighting by Tiff Crutchfield looks wonderful, both in its use of real apartment lighting, as well as stage lighting.

The Family Digs is a fun piece that I hope finds a good theater life — its a perfect diversion for an evening or afternoon, and its appeal should find a home in regional and community theaters nationwide, starved for good new material with a small cast and modest production needs. I didn’t count but by my estimate the theater holds about 75 people or so, and it was sold out at my performance this afternoon.

I laughed often and had a terrific time at this show, in its wonderful new intimate studio theatre home.

Very Highly Recommended.

The Family Digs continues at Croswell Opera House through October 22nd. Limited tickets available and it is easiest to get them online at http://www.croswell.org 

 

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Croswell announces 2017-18 Special Event Series October 8, 2017

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Croswell announces 2017-18 Special Event Series

Concerts, musicals, a play, a children’s show, and more are coming up this fall, winter and spring at the Croswell Opera House.

The Croswell’s 2017-18 Special Event Series will run from October through April. It includes a few previously announced events plus several new shows.

“The Family Digs” (Oct. 13-22): This new play by Terry Hissong will be the first fully staged production in the Croswell’s new studio theater. A two-act comedy, it tells the story of an eccentric archaeologist, his long-suffering adult daughter, his freeloading New Age son, and what could be the greatest archaeological discovery of all time. Peter Stewart plays the father, Dr. Charles Edwards, with Meg McNamee as his long-suffering daughter, Eve, and Jonathan Stelzer as his New Age-aficionado son, Robert, who insists on being called Sunshine. Emily Allshouse and Karen Miller play Sophia and Hannah, two of Eve’s co-workers.

The play will be the first fully staged production in the Croswell’s new James E. Van Doren Studio, which is located on the second floor of the theater at 129 E. Maumee St. in Adrian. It is being presented in collaboration with Westfall-Hissong Productions.

“The Family Digs” runs the weekends of Oct. 13-15 and Oct. 20-22, with Friday and Saturday shows at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday shows at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 for adults and $15 for students. The play is recommended for ages 13 and up.

Fun Pianos by 176 Keys (Oct. 28 at 7:30 p.m.): The Dueling Pianos return to the Croswell stage for a one-night event. This is an adult-oriented show. In addition to auditorium seating, a limited amount of on-stage table seating is available.

Local premiere of the film “All or Nothin’” (Nov. 4 at 7:30 p.m.): Beloved local icon Laura Haviland is among the characters in this new film about a group of slaves who escaped from bondage in 1853. The movie, by Ann Arbor filmmaker Charles Campbell, was partially filmed in Lenawee County. Admission will be by donation, and a Q&A session with the filmmaker will be offered afterward.

Branson on the Road (Nov. 11 at 5:30 p.m.): Classic country music takes the stage in this salute to American history and heroes. Led by Debbie Horton, who once played lead guitar for the late Johnny Cash, Branson on the Road presents a musical journey with a patriotic theme for Veterans Day.

“Meet Me in St. Louis” (Nov. 25 to Dec. 10):
Opening Thanksgiving weekend, the Croswell’s annual holiday musical is the heartwarming tale of a turn-of-the-century American family anticipating the wonders of the 1904 World’s Fair. The stage musical is based on the movie of the same name, and includes well-known tunes such as “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” “The Trolley Song,” and “The Boy Next Door.”

Carols and Candlelight with Michael Lackey (Dec. 21 at 7:30 p.m.): This evening of entertainment will take place in the James E. Van Doren Studio and feature Broadway veteran Michael Lackey performing a variety of Christmas favorites in a cabaret-style setting. Seating will be limited.

Wizards of Winter (Dec. 22 at 7:30 p.m.):
Wizards of Winter was founded by former members of the Trans-Siberian Orchestra and features a similar mix of rock-style holiday favorites, complete with spectacular special effects.

“Godspell” (Jan. 27 to Feb. 3): This Tony-nominated musical by Stephen Schwartz will be the Croswell’s annual all-area high school production. It will be directed by Michael Yuen, who played John the Baptist and Judas in the 2000-01 national tour of the show.

You Rock, Valentine! (Feb. 14 at 7:30 p.m.): This event, taking place in Van Doren Studio, will combine rock hits performed by Dave Rains with dinner catered by the Hathaway House. Seating will be limited.

“The Big Meal” (Feb. 23 to March 4):
This dramatic comedy, which won author Dan LeFranc the 2010 New York Times Outstanding Playwright Award, spans 80 years and five generations in the life of one American family.

Your Generation (March 10 at 7:30 p.m.): Formerly known as 50-Amp Fuse, Your Generation presents a tribute show that journeys through five decades of pop, rock, dance and R&B. This will be the band’s first Croswell appearance.

“Stellaluna and Other Tales” (March 23-31): Based on the book series by Janell Cannon, this hour-long musical is aimed at children from pre-K through fourth grade.

Disco Night at the Croswell (April 7 at 7:30 p.m.): Singer Tatiana Owens, who previously appeared in “Memphis” and “Million Dollar Quartet,” will return for a one-night concert featuring hits from performers like Donna Summer, Sister Sledge, the Bee Gees, and more.

“Disenchanted” (April 13-22): This comic, not-for-children musical follows fairy-tale princesses like Snow White and Cinderella to find out what happens after “happily ever after.”

Ben Daniels Band (April 28 at 7:30 p.m.): The Michigan-based Ben Daniels Band has become a favorite at venues like The Ark and The Blind Pig, as well as at concert halls around the country. This will be the band’s first Croswell appearance.

Tickets for all shows in the 2017-18 Special Event Series will go on sale Oct. 9.

Open auditions for “Godspell,” “The Big Meal,” “Stellaluna and Other Tales,” and “Disenchanted” will be announced soon.

For more information, go to croswell.org.

Beautiful “Beauty and the Beast” at Croswell Opera House (Review) September 24, 2017

Posted by ronannarbor in Croswell Opera House, musical theater, Musicals.
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If you are one of the lucky ticket holders to the sold-out Beauty and The Beast at Croswell Opera House, you are in for a delightful (and beautiful) evening of musical theater. I’m going to be upfront and say that BATB is one of my favorite musicals, the first in the long, successful run of Disney-on-Broadway hits.

There is great Direction by Sue Smith, wonderful Musical Direction by Dave Rains, and lovely Choreography by Sarah Nowak, together with scrumptious costumes by Pam Krage, spot-on Lighting Design by Tiff Crutchfield, and lovely Scenic/Projection Design by Patrick Lord — the production is of the highest quality. The show moves at a fast clip, scene changes are seamless, and everything looks and feels exquisite.

But this show is nothing without a terrific cast, and you have that in droves (literally in some ensemble numbers). Kristen Fandrey is a beautiful and fine-voiced Belle, and she is a great actor too. Jarrod Alexander ranks among the best Beasts I have seen, and his is a performance that is not to be missed. Peter Crist is hilarious as Gaston while Matthew Johnson is very strong all-around as LeFou. The wonderful David Blackburn steals every scene he is in as Lumiere (which is to be expected), and Michael Yuen is a delightful Cogsworth. But there is more! Maria Porter-Mohler plays a lovely Mrs. Potts, Margaret Hyre is great as Madame de la Grande Bouche, and Abby Dots is very fun as Babette. Mark Hyre is also a terrific Maurice. The rest of the supporting cast and ensemble are very strong.

Mix a beautifully written show, with a fantastic-looking production and this strong cast, and Croswell Opera House finishes out its summer season with true theater magic. The show run through October 1, but it is sold out. Check the box office for cancellations and last minute releases, or check online at croswell.org

True to its Name, Croswell’s Forum is A Funny Thing (Review) August 15, 2017

Posted by ronannarbor in Croswell Opera House, Michigan, musical theater, Musicals, Theatre.
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Guest Review by Devon Barrett

To the uninitiated, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, the 1962 musical comedy by Stephen Sondheim, currently playing at the Croswell Opera House in Adrian, sounds like something that would be anything but funny.

Because, honestly, the list of characters looks like a laundry list of things nobody really wants to talk about: courtesans. Slaves. A nagging wife. A henpecked husband who spends 2/3 of the show considering adultery. A pompous, self-aggrandizing military captain. A young woman whose only skill is being “lovely.”

But when you weave them all together into a plot (the literary kind and the devious kind), that includes a couple of hilarious musical numbers, an epic, mind-boggling full-cast chase scene, and a happy ending with a delightful, surprising twist I guarantee you won’t see coming, well, you’ve got yourself a comedy.

The show opens with Pseudolus, a slave in the House of Senex, and the show’s buoyant instigator-in-chief, played by Jared Hoffert who could not be more perfect for the role. He introduces us to the three Proteans, played by John Bacarella, Mark Hyre, and A.J. Howard, who toggle between roles—as slaves, soldiers, and, in that epic chase scene I mentioned earlier, courtesan-catchers—so rapidly that you start to wonder whether they’ve all got body doubles hiding in the wings.

The year is 200-ish B.C. The place: a residential street in ancient Rome. And the deal: Pseudolus will be granted freedom if he can get his young master Hero (played by Xavier Sarabia, who sings through a boyish, crinkly-eyed grin perfectly befitting his character’s innocence), hooked up with Philia, the virginal, empty-headed courtesan-next-door (played by Emily Hribar, who has a lovely, clear voice, and a gentle presence) before Hero’s parents, Senex and Domina, return from visiting the in-laws.

Hero’s proud, domineering mother Domina and her namby-pamby husband Senex are played by Julia Hoffert and Ron Baumanis, respectively. Senex’s lighthearted joy and light-footed dancing during “Everybody Ought to Have a Maid” was his standout moment. And Domina’s moment came in the form of a deliberate, fourth-wall-breaking evil-eye during the second act, when she unexpectedly burst back onto the scene, eliciting a gasp and a whooshing chorus of “uh-oh’s” from the audience, who knew stuff was about to hit the fan. She stood, alone, center stage, for two or three beats, staring right out at Orchestra Center with one eyebrow raised as if to say, “Excuse me? Uh-oh? I am a strong woman who knows what she wants in life and you say UH-OH when I enter the room?” Reader, IT. WAS. FANTASTIC.

Possibly the best part of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, is that it employs nearly every comedic device available, and every character gets a chance to partake.

Marcus Lycus, Senex’s neighbor to the left, is in the business of selling beautiful young women. Played by Stephen Kiersey, Lycus isn’t the slimy salesman-of-women you would expect him to be. He’s kind of a wuss, and his fear of facing one of his powerful clients—a captain named Miles Gloriosus, who we’ll discuss later—sets the show up for its first case of mistaken identity: when Pseudolus impersonates Lycus while Lycus hides in his home and, later, runs around with a cloak over his head pretending to be a leper.

The six courtesans (played by Jessica Adams, Tara Althaus, Madeline Auth, Jamie Lynn Buechele, Beth Felerski, and Sarah Nowak) of the House of Marcus Lycus each get a chance to show off their…er…skills to poor Pseudolus, who tries to play it cool as they dance, perform tricks, caress his hair, and in some cases, sensually threaten him with a whip. Their costumes, designed by Meg McNamee, were colorful and fun, and perfectly befitting of each of their personas.

Senex’s neighbor to the right, Erronius, played by William E. McCloskey, who is no stranger to the role, has his moment in the sun in the second act as his running gag (no spoilers! Witness it for yourself!) keeps time during the utter chaos playing out onstage.

Miles Gloriosus, the pompous Roman army captain who stands in the way of Hero’s chance at marrying Philia, is a sight to behold in his shiny, silver, chiseled armor. Played by Cordell Smith, Miles Gloriosus inflates his greatness at just about everything, but Smith’s rendition of “Bring Me My Bride” requires no inflation…it’s just great.

Then there’s Hysterium, played by John MacNaughton. Hysterium and Pseudolus spend a great deal of time together throughout the show, and Hoffert and MacNaughton play off of one another so brilliantly. As Pseudolus’ plot to affiance Hero and Philia goes further and further off the rails, Pseudolus himself continues to roll with the punches, while Hysterium, despite his insistence to the contrary, grows increasingly…well…hysterical.

And so, too, does the audience. Because, bottom line, Forum is funny, and it doesn’t even need to try to be anything else.

Directed by Mark DiPietro, with musical direction by Jonathan Sills, choreography by Delle Clair, and scenic design by Leo Babcock, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum runs through Sunday, August 20th at the Croswell Opera House, Michigan’s oldest theatre, located in downtown Adrian. If you haven’t been to the Croswell since its major renovation (or—HORRORS—if you haven’t been there at all!) now is the time. It is truly a sight to behold.

A Funny Thing Happened on the way To The Forum runs through August 20th. Tickets at Croswell.org

“Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” takes flight (kinda) at Croswell Opera House (Review) June 11, 2017

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Croswell Opera House launched its 2017 Summer Season with the musical Chitty Chitty Bang Bang last night, and it’s a neat production of the mega-effects laden show.

Basically following the same storyline (and music with the exception of a couple new numbers) of the movie, Act 1 sets things up, and Act 2 amps up the ante as the action reaches Vulgaria. The musical had a long successful run on London’s West End but not so successful on Broadway. What it did have was an amazing car that flew, tilted, swiveled, and moved up and out over the orchestra as the proscenium filled with stars – there was no denying that no matter what your thoughts about the material itself, that flying car special effect was THE attraction for this show.

Not so much at Croswell’s production, where there is a car, but the action centers more around the human characters, who are brought to life by a vivid cast of performers. The car takes a more peripheral role and I am not sure that is for the better in a musical that is basically ABOUT the car.

Peter Crist plays an excellent Caractacus Potts, paired nicely with Kayla Marsh as Truly Scrumptious. Jeremy and Jemima Potts are precocious and charming Matthew Antalek and Oliva Goosman who are engaging and never cloying. Grandpa Potts is delightfully played by Steve Hillard, though the lyrics of his “Posh” were a bit muffled. Stephen Kiersey is a creepy Childcatcher and Terry Hissong (great to see on stage again!) an endearing Toy Maker. Bruce Hardcastle and Steven Owsley are practically perfect as Boris and Goran the Vulgarian spies (ahem, vulgar spies). While the entire ensemble is solid (although there are too many of them on stage during some of the numbers, cluttering things up a bit) the show is stolen out from everyone else in its second act by Leah Fox as the Baroness and Jeffrey King as the Baron Bomburst. Their flirtatious “Chu-Chi Face” is an absolute scream. Both Leah and Jeffrey turn in performances that are deadpan straightforward in their lunacy and makes it even funnier by contrast. The Baroness accidentally shoots one of her lackeys, and she exclaims an understated (and howlingly funny) “oops”. Bravo.

The Direction by Julianne Dolan and Choreography by Sarah Nowak focus on the human relationships, even during dance numbers. If I have a quibble its that the pacing and line pickup seemed slow through much of the first act (it got better in the second) and scene changes took a bit too long, occasionally stopping the action while nothing happens except for a chunk of set coming in or out.

Costumes by Susan Eversden are truly scrumptious indeed. Wynne Marsh has done her usual excellent musical direction. Tiff Crutchfield’s lighting design is colorful and bright. Sound Design is excellent – thanks to the donors who helped sponsor the new sound system! Patrick Lord’s projection and Scenic Design are well integrated into the production and things look spiffy and bright.

And that car? Well, its there, and its serviceable. It stays very much earth bound. It looks pretty and most of the effects worked, but it needed human assistance a few times making turns and it called for a bit more magic.  Still, overall this is a big beautiful looking production and it shows throughout.

A final aside — to the family sitting next to me, it in NEVER okay to hand out sandwiches in crinkly paper to your kids, pop open soda cans, nor serve potato chips to your kids inside a theater during the show. Never. Basic theater etiquette 101.

Recommended.

Photo taken by Lad Strayer, Croswell Opera House

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang continues at The Croswell Opera House, 129 E. Maumee, Adrian MI through June 25th. Tickets (selling very fast) at croswell.org or 517-264-SHOW.

Hilarious “The Drowsy Chaperone” at Croswell Opera House (review) August 13, 2016

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The-Drowsy-Chaperone

Croswell Opera House opened its final musical of the summer season, The Drowsy Chaperone, last night in Adrian — and they have saved the best for last! Drowsy is a musical theater-lovers dream show, and it is hilarious and exceptionally well done at Croswell.

Man in Chair (gifted and very funny Patrick Toth) settles in to tell the audience the story of 1920’s musical theater “chestnut” The Drowsy Chaperone, complete with fond anecdotes about the cast, the show, and an equally catty look at musicals today. Toth is onstage the entire evening and the work that he does is remarkable. Never out of character, he guides, narrates, and even participates in some of the scenes. Great job. He does exactly what the opening monologue says he will do — transport you to another place, even if it is inside his apartment.

Equally wonderful are Erica Wyman as the chaperone, whose boozy “As We Stumble Along” equaled or maybe excelled over Beth Leavel’s tony-winning performance last night as she performed “the greatest anthem to alcoholism”; and Franny Kromminga as ingenue Janet — who clearly is having the time of her life “not showing off no more”. Matthew Pecek plays a spry bridegroom, Robert, and Joseph Ball a hilarious best man George. Suzanne Smith and Stephen Kiersey are delightful as Tottendale and Underling. Jared Hoffert is very funny as he chews the scenery as producer Feldzieg, and Jamie Lynn Buechele, as his girlfriend Kitty, shines in a hilarious vocal role. Throw in John Bacarella and Peter Stewart as dancing gangsters, a wonderful over the top performance by Bruce Hardcastle as Adolpho (whaaaat?), and fine Lori Macdonald as Trix the Aviatrix.

The leads are supported by a strong ensemble (though at times there are too many of them on stage making some scenes feel like, well, there are too many people on stage). But they sing and dance well, and help with set changes as necessary. Everything moves non-stop, even acting scenes take on a musical tone and movement. Bravo.

Director Mark DiPietro has done a masterful job keeping everything barreling along, laugh after laugh, and choreographer Delle Clair has provided fun (and audience pleasing) choreography including a plentiful smattering of tap. Musical Director Jonathan Sills stellar vocal work shows throughout, and his wonderful orchestra does the Croswell proud yet again.

Doug Miller has created a gorgeous set, and it all works well and runs like clockwork. Pam Krage and Emily Gifford designed the many beautiful (and often large) costume pieces. Tiff Crutchfield has lit it all in colorful broadway shades and it works well on the stage.

It should be noted that this otherwise intermission-less musical has an intermission added at the Croswell — so that instead of being out the door on your way to after-show drinks at 9:50, you’ll be there a bit later.

I have now seen Drowsy many times — and it makes me laugh out loud every time. DiPietro has mined the show for even more laughs than I can recall — and it made me feel positively giddy at the end of the evening.

Very Highest Recommendation.

The Drowsy Chaperone continues at The Croswell Opera House through August 21st. Tickets at croswell.org or by calling 517-264-SHOW

Music and Lyrics by Lisa Lambert and Greg Morrison, Book by Bob Martin and Don McKellar.

 

 

Daniel Clair and Kyrie Bristle shine in “Leap of Faith” – Croswell Opera House, review July 16, 2016

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Daniel Clair, playing a conniving traveling tent-show preacher, and Kyrie Bristle as a small-town sheriff are the reasons to see this shiny musical theater adaptation of “Leap of Faith” which opened last night at the Croswell Opera House. Your enjoyment will be enhanced if you like bible-belt hokum and are a fan of the film from which it is adapted. But…well… I’ll get to that momentarily…

Directed by Michael Yuen, the cast is strong, including the stellar Clair and Bristle, and also a fine performance by Anthony Isom in the role of sham-exposer which features soaring vocals and acting chops indeed. Also very good is Sarah Nowak as the preacher’s sister, whose sincerity shines through in one of the shows nicest most underplayed scenes, willing to take the blame when things go south fast. Cooper Adams is a fine young boy in the tear-jerker part (you can see what’s coming a mile away). The entire ensemble has plenty to do in multiple large musical numbers — even if they do all sound (and pretty much look) the same. Still there is no denying how good this ensemble is, and how much work has gone into making these three tent-revivals move on stage. From a blocking point of view, I thought the staging was somewhat flat, and most often played in two, rarely moving down toward the audience.

I saw “Leap of Faith” on Broadway and had the same reaction I had here — there is nothing wrong with this show. There also isn’t anything that makes it great. The show is bland and there isn’t much you can do about it. Most of the (music by Alan Menken, lyrics by Glenn Slater) songs feel like they are cut from other shows (and many likely were from “Sister Act” which Menken had written shortly before). The mini-dramas do not have enough sizzle to them to make things truly spark — and the “big moment” toward the end of the show is a direct rip-off from The Music Man. But it all clearly works, as the audience members around me were tearing up in the requisite places and were moved to a standing ovation, so it clearly connects to many. Although its Broadway run was very short, it did garner Tony nominations across the board, including a nomination for Best Musical, although you might wonder why after seeing it. I am probably not this show’s primary target market.

And now the but…Daniel Clair owns this show from the moment he appears. You’ll remember him as Huey Calhoun in last summer’s production of Memphis. Here he gets to expand his singing chops and wow, he presents a masterclass in musical theatrics. Its a shame that Cercone and Leight’s script lets him down (as it did the equally fine Raul Esparza on Broadway). His ability to sell a song be it a ballad or a rollicking spiritual-laced rock song is stellar. Throw in the equally vocally gifted Kyrie Bristle, and it is no surprise that their scenes alone and together are what make this musical truly slick.

Doug Miller’s set design is beautiful, and its cleanly lit by Tiff Crutchfield. Costumes, props and other technical values are up to Croswell’s usual best. Dave Rains musical direction is excellent — and his large orchestra sounds terrific. The sound design by Joe Gozdowski balances the (loud) orchestra with stage sound with a good mix.

Recommended.

Leap of Faith continues at Croswell Opera House through July 24th.Croswell.org or 517-264-SHOW for tickets.

A Whole Lotta Shakin’ Going On at Croswell’s “Million Dollar Quartet” (Review) May 15, 2016

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You’d be hard-pressed not to think that the Broadway tour of Million Dollar Quartet has made a stop in Adrian, MI, because this production, launching the 2016 summer season at Croswell Opera House is that terrific.

Start with the remarkable set by Doug Miller. Upon entering the theater, you’re greeted by his car-part-shop-turned-studio set, and its gorgeous. Then the lights come up and the evening is filled with one remarkable song after another, as four talented gents and one uber-talented lady enact the night in 1956 that four of rock-and-roll’s highest profile stars all gathered at Sun Studios to jam (and later, there’s a real-life photo to prove it, which brings some surprising audience tears).

Jonathan Crayne gets the night rolling as Carl Perkins. Add in Phillip Baugh as Johnny Cash. Don’t leave out John Grieco as Jerry Lee Lewis, and top it off with Lawrence Havelka as Elvis Presley. Along for the ride is Presley’s girlfriend Dyanne (Tatiana Owens). The band is rounded out by Tim Prettyman on bass, and Keith Kemner on drums. Director Eric Parker plays Sam Phillips, Sun Records owner, who serves as narrator for the evening. And for anyone who thinks acting is a glamorous job — take into consideration the remarkable talent involved in not only singing, dancing, and acting your way through a show filled with non-stop songs but to actually play the instruments yourselves live on stage. Yes, its remarkable.

What follow are 23 exciting rock-and-roll songs, and a jam-packed megamix finale that will leave you clapping, cheering, and dancing along. (Literally — Jerry Lee Lewis comes into the audience to make sure you are standing and shakin’).

It is a fine fine night indeed — while some numbers rock a bit more than others — there isn’t a dull moment in the show, and you’ll find yourself fully absorbed in one of those “birth of rock and roll” iconic moments (much like last summer’s Memphis). Watch for Grieco’s spot-on Jerry Lee Lewis back-bending theatrics before evening’s end, Johnny Cash’s sultry bass singing, Elvis’s pre-icon swagger, and Perkins straight-out rock and roll. And you’ll leave the theater having not only been enormously entertained, but also having learned a bit about the whole process of early music making.

Credit also Tiff Crutchfield’s excellent lighting; Dave Rains super work as Music Director, Betsy Lackey’s wonderful costumes, and Joe Gozdowski’s exceptional sound design. Director Eric Parker keeps everything moving swiftly and looking utterly professional from top to bottom. Choreographer Meg McNamee gives everyone character-appropriate moves.

You’ll have your favorites — from singers to songs, but you won’t leave disappointed as Million Dollar Quartet rocks the Croswell Opera House.

My only complaint is the addition of an intermission. This show is written and meant to be performed straight through (it is only 100 minutes long) and in this instance the addition of an intermission is particularly glaring as it breaks the integrity of the show when lights simply go out on stage and come up in the house. Boo.  I hope a similarly egregious intermission does not occur in the intermissionless Drowsy Chaperone later this summer.

Highly Recommended.

Million Dollar Quartet continues at the Croswell Opera House, 129 E Maumee St, Adrian, MI through May 22nd. Tickets: croswell.org or 517-264-SHOW

 

 

 

 

 

Croswell Opera House – Million Dollar Quartet May 10, 2016

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One day in December 1956, four up-and-coming musicians met by chance at the Sun Records studio in Memphis, Tennessee.

Their names were Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash. All four would go on to shape the face of rock ’n’ roll for an entire generation. And the story of that legendary jam session has been memorialized in a Tony Award-winning musical, “Million Dollar Quartet,” which opens May 13 at the Croswell Opera House in Adrian.

Lawrence Havelka of Chelsea, who was last seen at the Croswell in last summer’s “Big Fish,” plays Elvis. The role of Jerry Lee Lewis will be played by John Grieco, a New York-based actor and singer. Jonathan Crayne of Adrian will play Carl Perkins. And Johnny Cash will be played by Phil Baugh of Fort Collins, Colorado, whose past roles at the Croswell include “Walk the Line,” a musical based on the country singer’s life.

Eric Parker of Chicago, who is directing the show, will also play the role of Sun Records owner Sam Phillips. Tatiana Owens, a Toledo native who now lives in New York and starred in last summer’s production of “Memphis,” will play Elvis’ girlfriend, Dyanne. The singers will be backed by Keith Kemner of Adrian as Fluke, a studio drummer, and Tim Prettyman of Tecumseh as Jay Perkins, a bassist who is also Carl Perkins’ brother.

Rather than impersonate the stars with all of the trademark moves they developed later in life, Parker said the cast of “Million Dollar Quartet” will try to capture the energy and innocence of four young stars at the beginning of their careers.

“This just captures them as young guys — young Southern boys doing what they love to do,” he said. “They’re relatively innocent guys with the first blush of success on them.”

The show takes place in the Sun Records recording studio, and scenic designer Doug Miller has decorated the set to look like a postwar studio built in a converted auto parts store. Costumes by Betsy Lackey will complete the picture, bringing the audience back to the early days of rock ’n’ roll as the cast tears through many of the four stars’ greatest hits.

“Million Dollar Quartet” runs the weekends of May 13-15 and May 20-22, with Friday and Saturday performances at 8 p.m. and Sunday performances at 2:30 p.m. Tickets range from $15 to $35 and may be ordered online at croswell.org or by calling 517-264-7469.

The Croswell Opera House is at 129 E. Maumee St. in downtown Adrian. Because the front of the building is under construction, parking behind the theater is recommended.

If you go

  • What: “Million Dollar Quartet”
  • When: May 13-15 and May 20-22, with Friday and Saturday shows at 8 p.m. and Sunday shows at 2:30 p.m.
  • Where: Croswell Opera House, 129 E. Maumee St., Adrian
  • Tickets: $15 to $35
  • More info: croswell.org

Croswell Opera House announces 2015-2016 Special Events August 31, 2015

Posted by ronannarbor in Croswell Opera House, musical theater, Theatre.
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A tribute to Cole Porter, a Motown-themed concert featuring singer Tatiana Owens, and several children’s events will be included in the Croswell Opera House’s 2015-16 Special Event Season, which begins in September.

Artistic director Jere Righter said the Special Event Season gives the Croswell a chance to put on a diverse mix of shows.

“People know us for our musicals, but we’re also starting to build a real following for our one-night concerts, our children’s events, and of course our plays,” Righter said. “I’m excited about the shows we’re planning. We have shows for all ages and tastes, and that’s a great way to let people know that the Croswell really has something for everyone.”

The Spectacular Saturday Series will return with several daytime events for children and families. Spectacular Saturday events will take place at 11 a.m. Oct. 17, Nov. 7, Dec. 5, Feb. 27 and April 9, with each show preceded by a craft or other activity starting at 10 a.m.

New additions this year will include three staged readings in the Croswell art gallery and a series of casual events, called Croswell After Hours, every Thursday from 5 to 7 p.m., starting Sept. 10.

“The Drawer Boy”: The Special Event Season will kick off with a staged reading of this play by Canadian writer Michael Healey. Set on a farm in Ontario, “The Drawer Boy” tells of the lives of two bachelor farmers from the viewpoint of a young actor from Toronto who visits their farm to interview them. The reading will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 2, in the Croswell gallery. Tickets are not required, but donations will be accepted.

“The Velveteen Rabbit”: The first installment in the Spectacular Saturday Series, this retelling of the classic children’s story about a toy who wants to be real is presented by Bright Star Touring Theatre. The show is at 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 17, with a craft activity starting at 10 a.m.

“The Rocky Horror Picture Show”: The 1975 cult film will be screened at midnight Friday and Saturday, Oct. 30 and 31, with a preshow, including costume contest, starting at 11 p.m.

Aysenur Kolivar: The first artist-in-residence for the Arts Midwest World Fest, Turkish folksinger Aysenur Kolivar, will perform at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 6, following a week of workshops and other cultural events throughout Lenawee County.

Disney’s “Frozen”: Back by popular demand, the Croswell will screen the animated hit “Frozen” at 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 7. Last year’s showing included a photo opportunity with a real live Elsa, and this year her sister Anna will be joining in the fun.

Dueling Pianos: 176 Keys, which last performed at the Croswell in April 2014, will return for a special engagement at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20. A limited number of on-stage seats are available in addition to main floor seating.

“Handel’s Messiah Rocks”: The Croswell’s 2015 Christmas show will be a high-energy, rock-style adaptation of George Frideric Handel’s “The Messiah,” with school and church choirs from around the area being invited to take part in the production. The show will open the Saturday after Thanksgiving, and run for two weekends.

“The Story of the Nutcracker and the Mouse King”: Specially adapted for younger audiences, this reimagining of Tchaikovsky’s classic ballet will include lyrics and scenes acted out between musical numbers to allow young children to more easily follow the story. Performances will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 5; 6:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 11; 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 12; and 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 13.

“Red, Hot and Cole”: A tribute to the music of Cole Porter, “Red, Hot and Cole” will be the Croswell’s seventh annual all-area high school production. Featuring a talented cast of young people from Lenawee and surrounding counties and with new orchestrations by the Croswell’s Dave Rains, this musical traces Porter’s career from his roots in Indiana to the music halls and soundstages of Broadway and Hollywood. The show will run Jan. 23-24 and Jan. 29-31, with Friday and Saturday shows at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday shows at 2:30 p.m.

“Shrinking Violets and Towering Tiger Lilies”: A staged reading in the Croswell gallery, this show is a collection of seven short plays by Tina Howe about women navigating an array of distressing situations: a doctor’s appointment, a photo shoot, a water aerobics class. The reading will be at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 5, in the Croswell gallery. Tickets are not required, but donations will be accepted.

“Spirit of Motown: Tatiana Owens in Concert”: Toledo-born singer-songwriter Tatiana Owens, who starred in this summer’s production of “Memphis,” returns from New York for a special one-weekend engagement, performing Motown and R&B hits from the ’50s, ’60s and beyond, plus a few of her own original songs. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 13, and 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 14.

“Jackie Robinson”: Presented by Bright Star Touring Theatre, this show is part of the Spectacular Saturday Series and tells about the life of Jackie Robinson, one of the pioneering athletes who helped integrate professional sports. The show is at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 27.

“How I Became a Pirate”: This musical for young audiences, based on the book by Melinda Long, features a band of comical pirates enlisting a boy named Jeremy Jacob to join their crew. Songs include “Green Teeth,” “I’m Really Just a Sensitive Guy” and “Talk Like a Pirate.” Performances will run March 4-6 and March 11-13. The first weekend will have a 6:30 p.m. Friday show and 2:30 shows on Saturday and Sunday, with Saturday’s show being a sensory-friendly production for children with autism or sensory processing issues. The second weekend will have 6:30 p.m. shows Friday and Saturday and a 2:30 p.m. show Sunday. Additional performances for school groups will take place during the school day March 8 and 9.

Backstage Brews: Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with unique beer, cider and wines from Michigan and beyond at the Croswell’s second annual craft beer festival, starting at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 18.

“The Imaginary Invalid”: This three-act comedy by the 17th-century French playwright Molière will be the third installment in the Croswell’s series of staged readings. It will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 1, in the Croswell gallery. Tickets are not required, but donations will be accepted.

“The Lego Movie”: This 2014 animated adventure will be the final installment in this year’s Spectacular Saturday Series. The movie will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 9, with activities before the movie starting at 10 a.m.

Baladino: The 2015-16 Special Event Series will wrap up with the second of four Arts Midwest World Fest performances. The spring 2016 artists-in-residence will be the Israeli ensemble Baladino. The group will present several workshops and other cultural activities throughout the county, followed by a public performance at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 16.

End-of-season concert: A rock concert on Saturday, April 23, will close out the season and celebrate the upcoming 2016 Summer Broadway Season, with details to be announced.

The schedule for Croswell After Hours events, which will include trivia nights, singalongs and various types of light entertainment, will be posted at croswell.org/afterhours.

Tickets for the Special Event Season will go on sale Sept. 16, except for “Handel’s Messiah Rocks,” which is already on sale.

To buy tickets or for more information about any Croswell production, call 517-264-7469 or go to croswell.org.