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Why “Come From Away” should win this year’s Tony for Best Musical (and why “Dear Evan Hansen” should not) May 5, 2017

Posted by ronannarbor in Broadway Musicals, musical theater, Musicals.
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On June 11th, 2017, when this year’s Tony Awards are announced, I expect to see “Come From Away” the big winner in the musical category. What? You haven’t even heard of it? Well, you should. And I know there is that ground-swell support from younger folks for “Dear Even Hansen” but here is why that one shouldn’t win.

COME FROM AWAY will most likely win the Best Musical this year. I said so the moment I left the theater the first time I saw it in Toronto, and keep that same opinion after the third time I saw it in NYC. Quite simply, it has the strongest message of the bunch, and the strongest overall musical theater artistry of the bunch. Don’t label it a “9/11 Musical” — it is not. Its a show about a community coming together in the face of a crisis – and it is the only one of the four musicals nominated this year that has those stakes. More so, lets not forget the Tony Awards are also business oriented, it is the sole show of the four nominees that could use the ticket sale boost. That is always a consideration at award time. This is also the only show of the bunch that I left the theater humming any of the tunes.

DEAR EVEN HANSEN has a great score, no doubt about it, even if I never want to hear anyone sing “Waving Through a Window” unless it is in context of the show. It also has young-folks appeal because of the hot-selling cast album. And it also has the most mixed reviews of any of the current musicals nominated. What it got were raves for Ben Platt as Evan, and the score. Expect to see Tony awards for Ben Platt, and the score. But Best Musical? I don’t think so. Without giving away too much, the entire drama of this show is so millennial-centric that it makes no impact on older audiences — the central drama involves a millennial teenager APOLOGIZING for something he did that was dreadfully wrong. That is it. If our millennial audiences find making an apology the most horrifying thing they have to do, then we have done something very wrong in this everyone-gets-a-participation prize and there-are-n0-consequences-for-your-appalling-actions era.

NATASHA AND PIERRE AND THE GREAT COMET OF 1812 is a spectacular musical. I loved every minute of it. Telling the central love story of War and Peace in a Russian-cabaret type setting (even the theater interior has been changed to resemble an in-the-round Russian tent) it has made the rounds from off-off to off and now on Broadway. It is also without a doubt the most bizarre and polarizing of the current nominees — people either love it or they hate it, and you can find plenty of both online. The general reaction is, wow, the staging is remarkable, and indeed look for a Tony for best Direction here. But it also leaves a large number of the audience scratching their heads and asking themselves what exactly is going on here (and I don’t mean in that artsy fartsy “Nine” sort of way). That is never a good marker for awards.

GROUNDHOG DAY is terrific. Another show that I simply loved. Andy Karl will give Ben Platt a run for his money for Best Actor, but ultimately Platt will win the day. It has a fun score, though nothing here is as singable as DEH’s terrific score. It has fun scenic design and illusions. But ultimately, it is what it is — a stage version of the movie — albeit it BETTER than the movie. Still, Groundhog Day is slight at best, carries a message of tolerance, but just barely, and while it won the Olivier award last month for Best Musical, that isn’t going to happen here in NYC.

That brings me back to COME FROM AWAY. This is the little musical that thought it could, and it did, and it should win. There isn’t a better feel-good musical to be found in NYC right now, and that we share this with a vision created by our Canadian neighbors will go a long way to awards-land next month.

You can’t go wrong seeing any of these shows this season. But you will thank yourself for seeing Come From Away because you will feel something you haven’t at a musical in a long time — hope.

 

 

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Come From Away the musical is the best new show of the season (Review) March 31, 2017

Posted by ronannarbor in Broadway Musicals, musical theater, Musicals.
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I saw Come From Away in Toronto pre-Broadway twice, and have already reviewed it, but wanted to add a few words about the Broadway production which has now opened at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre.

When I left the theater in Toronto, I posted on Facebook that I had just left the Best Musical of the season feeling like I haven’t felt leaving a theater in, well, ever. 12 actors and an on-stage band play hundreds of different people both in the small Newfoundland town of Gander as well as the “plane people” when the events of 9/11 close down airports and flight for 4 days leaving 7000 people stranded in the small town where there were fewer residents than visitors. The town banded together to gather supplies and extend hospitality to the plane people while everyone watched the events on tv, finding out about what had happened almost two days later than the rest of us.

You would think this would be a heavy drama – but it is not — its a celebration of small town life, supporting your fellow man, and the joy that can come of new relationships and friendships banding together in the face of terror.

Irene Sankoff and David Hein’s music almost never stops, as the songs play out in pop rock, folksy, almost blue-grassy sequences. The 12-person cast feels like you are watching 40, playing hundreds of parts. And there isn’t a weak performance in the entire group.

This is simply stunning theater work and you should not miss it. The standing ovation even before the final refrain had been sung points to the audience reaction to this intermissionless 110 minute show.

Mark my words, Evan Hansen, a few blocks away, will be waving through his window while Come From Away collects the lion’s share of awards in a few months. Its remarkable theater.

Very Highest Recommendation – Not to be Missed.